Info

Changing the Face of Yoga Podcast

Hosted by Stephanie Cunningham, a yoga teacher herself who is committed to sharing yoga with anyone, especially the over 50's. Stephanie created this podcast to share how yoga can be practiced by anyone with amazing benefits. Yoga teachers themselves will share their stories; discussing why they teach, who they teach, how students benefit. Every fortnight or so, we will release a new episode. We will talk with teachers about teaching children, curvy bodies, the elderly but also those that each yoga to support students with diabetes, cancer and mental health issues.
RSS Feed
Changing the Face of Yoga Podcast
2018
August
July
June
May
April
March
February


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2018
Aug 14, 2018

Highlights:

Working with other professionals to meet the needs of the whole person.

Benefits include better proprioception and social engagement

Collaborate with the family to help special needs children.

 

 

1:00 Introduction to Sheelah Rodriguez and Adaptability Yoga

Works in therapy centres, after school settings

Works with different challenges –physical, developmental, and mental challenges of children from toddlers to over 18.

May introduce the same material e.g. super heroes but at different developmental levels.

Class – starts slow, moves to the peak of activity, then down to calmer activities and then relaxation

Uses themes, music, mantras (self-affirmations), poses, meditation, some pranyama in classes

13:15 Work on the whole person

15:30 Collaborate with family and other professionals. Team approach; incorporates yoga concepts to meet the goals for the child set by other professionals.

Experience with other organisations and professionals through her work and has found that the other professionals are quite generous with their knowledge and support

18:30 Benefits to students include better understanding of proprioception, and helps with social engagement.

20:51 Tips

Contacts:

Website: www.adaptabilityyoga.ca

FB: AdaptAbilityYoga

Instagram: #adaptabilityyoga

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTSu3ZuZEbtWFkssbbNpVEQ

Aug 7, 2018

Highlights: Intensive Yoga Retreats for Cancer Patients

Lee Majewski has created and implements a 3 week intensive for those diagnosed with cancer.

Anyone with the diagnosis, in or finished with treatment can attend the retreats.

Yoga tools are taught to help them with their fear, feeling like a victim and negative thought patterns

6 years of research shows significant benefits for the attendees.

 

1:16 Introduction to Lee Majewski

3:15  Created a 3 week Intensive Retreat for Cancer Sufferers. Based on her own experience of cancer. There is a gap in care for cancer patients in that during or after the medical treatments there is no support or resources for dealing with the effects of the diagnosis or treatments.

6:20   Anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer, in treatment or finished with treatments of any type of cancer is eligible to attend the retreat. Each attendee develops with the facilatators their unique practice. Small groups

7:40 A typical day:

Asana and pranayama early, yoga lecture, pranayama and meditation, restorative yoga with mudras/guided meditation, yoga nidra. Chanting. Each is developing their own practice using tools they need to help them with their cancer journey.

10:45 Lee has done research on the effects of the retreat. Attendees take standardised psychological tests the first day, the last day and 3 months after. They have recently added tests at 6 months and 12 months post-retreat. They have 6 years of data.

14:00 Attendees Benefits: given back their control and lose their victim status. Many feel fear and/or depression. The tests show marked decrease in depression over the course of the retreat.

17:00 Structure of the retreat

First week: getting used to the place, diet, techniques, yoga and the other attendees.

Second week: Face their own fears, give them tools to help with these fears

Third week: Learn to manage their thought patterns. Establish their own unique practices and how to find time to do the practices daily.

23:10 Lee has also designed a chronic disease retreat based on the same organisation.

25:00 Contacts

Website: www.yogaforhealth.institute

Email: info@yogaforhealth.institute

FB: cancerdetox

25:37 Lee is looking for other yoga therapists to help her spread these retreats to other English speaking countries and then worldwide.

Jul 31, 2018

Highlights

YAMA Foundation of Hong Kong founded by Hersha Chellaram

offers classes and training in:

Accessible yoga for pregnancy, for differently abled children and adults, and training to become a yoga teacher for those with different abilities. 

 

Jul 24, 2018

Highlights:

Yoga teacher/therapist must read the class to provide the correct tools to meet the student/clients’ needs.

Internal Family Systems (IFS) combined with the yoga – asanas, breathing, visualisation, and meditation can help find the source of trauma.

Movement can disrupt trauma held in the body.

Have a healthy relationships with emotions like fear. Ignoring emotions stores them in the body.

 

1:15 Introduction to Yael Sunshine

2:56 Yael explains her classes for those suffering from breast cancer at Nyack Hospital. People can either be physically compromised from surgery or compromised energy from treatments. The yoga teacher/therapist should read the needs of the clients since there will be students all along the spectrum of breast cancer from diagnosis to years after treatment.

6:00 Healthy relationship with fear – Everyone has fear; fear can run you or you can have a relationship with fear. Allow yourself to feel fear (or any strong relationship), having dialogue with self about the emotion. Moving the body expresses/releases strong emotions.

8:45 Yael working with a psychologist uses Internal Family Systems (a type of therapy) based on Richard Schwartz’s work and yoga to help people and sustain change.

16:50 Recovery classes use yoga to physically feel the 12 steps as well as emotionally.

19:10 Take ourselves too seriously in yoga sometimes; need humor.

20:00 Yael contributing to “Your Shift Matters” which is based on the idea that a traumatic event can lead to transformation.

 

Contacts:

Websites: www.yaelsunshine.com

www.embodiedresiliencetechnique.com

FB: SundariWellness

Instagram: yaelsundari

Your Shift Matters: Breakdown to Breakthrough – Dana Zarcone

Jul 17, 2018

1:20 Introduction to Charlotta

3:25 Research on how yoga affects young people: Hippocampus .eu Working the  with the European Union and includes asylum seekers. Training those who work with young people like social workers, psychologists, teachers. Just started working with refugees in Italy. Syrians are open to yoga while Muslims from Africa can be concerned about religious issues.

6:20 Charlotta works with women in the UAE and has designed some yoga classes sensitive to Islam.  The women in the UAE have said that their yoga practice brings them closer to their religion, single gender classes, allow them to express how yoga might challenge or support their religion.

9:42 Pressures and stresses of being a teenager today. 1 in5 14-17 year olds have a diagnosable mental health issue. Suicide is the largest cause of death for males under 21. Social media is impacting health – constantly having to present yourself in a certain way while having a strong desire to belong. Acutely aware of suffering across the globe which can be difficult for young people.

13:40 Yoga’s benefits for young people: their greatest fear is being alone and not belonging. Yoga allows you to be alone with others. Moving, breathing, together but being in your own body.

16:11 Charlotta’s book: “Teen Yoga” a practical handbook on how we can help young people physically, mentally, spiritually (available in August 2018) . Audience for the book is professionals who use yoga as therapy within their professions. But is also good for parents.

18:15 Teen Yoga Foundation  - became a charity in 2016. Charlotta started teaching yoga in schools and because of the need, started training others to teach teen yoga. Invited to bring her teach in orphanages in Sierra Leone for children that had been traumatized. Invited to Kashmir. Will be working in Johannesburg in the townships. All of these places are hoping that yoga will cultivate inner peace which will then lead to outer peace and stop the fighting that these different countries have experienced.

24:50 Teenagers are disembodied – Psychologists almost always say that teenagers are disembodied; their bodies are not their friends. They look at themselves from the outside. Leads to less satisfying relationships, not knowing what emotions are (since they live in the body) they can’t get what they want. Yoga brings inner peace and self-acceptance

28:15 Have just launched the beta version of a yoga app for teenagers. Allows them to do yoga without having to go to classes. It should be available in 2019. Anyone wanting to know more about the foundation, especially young people, can contact Charlotta through her website. They always need more resources: people, money, assistance.

Contacts:

Website: www.teenyoga.com

FB, Instagram: teenyogamindfulness

Twitter: teenyogaglobal

Book: “Teen Yoga” – Amazon – available August, 2018.

Jul 10, 2018

Marsha Danzig – Yoga for Amputees

1:15 Introduction of Marsha

2:35 Yoga for Amputees – classes, yoga teacher training for teaching amputees. The basis of the classes and training is: every person is whole. Amputees may not feel whole physically, emotionally or mentally. Maybe stared at often. Takes effort everyday. Need resilience.

7:37 Marsha’s journey: starting teaching classes for “normal” people but attracted students with challenges. Students started asking for her help for their family, friends. Started teaching yoga for kids with challenges. Offered classes for veterans and gave workshops on that topic. The workshops grew into training because of the demand.

Yoga for amputees has been celebrated as one of 13 top programs for adaptive yoga for DoYouYoga.com

13:40 “Yoga for Amputees” – Marsha’s book will be published soon and it is quite complete: includes types of amputations, prostheses, adapting to amputations, chapter for clinicians and developing a patient care plan including yoga

Continued learning and client is the expert on what will work for them

16:00 How to make an amputee feel comfortable in class Teach to capabilities and the highest possibilities. Your belief in their ability to do yoga will make them believe it also. Amputees are inventive and creative, since they will be faced with new situations every day and have to figure out how to adjust.  Don’t put hands on the prosthesis.  Amputees practice mindfulness daily as they must be very aware of the situation and how their body will react.

23:02 Teacher training for teaching amputees. On-line course for trainees worldwide. With online weekly classes, trainees have more time to absorb the information. For teachers that may need help with a student with an amputation, Marsha provides consultations to develop the teacher’s expertise in providing yoga for that student.

25:57 “From the Roots: Marsha’s book about her journey. Includes poetry, stories, essays on how to live with long-term illness. Can be ordered from Amazon. Everyone should live daily at their highest essence and create daily.

Contacts;

Email: yogacalm@msn.com

Website, FB, Instagram: yogaforamputees

LinkedIn: marshatheresedanzig

YouTube: /watch?v=22EXDgMMVxw

Jul 3, 2018

1:19 Introduction to Melissa Turnock

2:35 Neurogenic Tremor

  • Returns NS to parasympathetic state
  • Richmond Heath of Melbourne brought TRE to Australia
  • Developed by David Berceli

4:35 TRE definition

  • Trauma Release Exercise
  • Developed in war-torn countries and places that experienced natural disasters. It is a mammalian response to trauma and stress.
  • Natural, involuntary tremors which release tension/tiredness in the muscles.
  • Tremors start in the adductors

9:32 TRE in a yoga class

  • Yoga asanas for 30 minutes
  • Tremoring – 15-20 minutes
  • Svasana – at least 15 minutes
  • Emphasis on breath throughout

12:50 Benefits to students of TRE

  • Sleep better
  • More alert
  • Opens spiritual/emotional state
  • Anxiety lessens
  • Helps injuries

17:45 Teach regulation and integration in class

Looking for irregular breathing, eye contact, engage in conversation, stop and start tremors so students know they are in control.

 

Contacts:

Email: mel@pittwaterpilates.com.au

Website: www.pittwaterpilates.com.au

FB: /pittpilatesandyoga/

Jun 26, 2018

1:12 Introduction to Christine Wushke and adjustments

2:15 Adjustments – many of us were taught hands-on adjustments to make the student’s body take a certain shape. Christine prefers supporting the student to go into their own body and learn to make their own adjustment and correct their own movement. Her philosophy is to a) help the meet their own yoga goals and b) how to support them to realise what they need to do make their own adjustments. Christine uses the Hakomi (a body-based therapy) precepts of mindfulness, non-violence and organicity to direct her adjustments.

8:15 Walking toward experiment. Two individuals each go into mindfulness, one quite deeply. The other one walks toward the other one. When in mindfulness, one is highly sensitized to movement and proximity. Students in a yoga class are usually relaxed and will be in some form of mindfulness and so very aware of movement and proximity.

16:25 Student led yoga – teacher supports them in meeting the student’s yoga goals and not the teacher’s goals. Teacher needs to be aware that cues will be interpreted differently by different students. Teachers need to learn how to track their students to see if a cue is causing them to react negatively.

21:00 Adjustments for safety. When is it appropriate to touch a student? Need consent, trust, and a sense of safety before adjusting. What is your reason for and how to touch a student to make an adjustment.  May touch to show a student a part of their body that they are not aware of or to emphasize a movement that is dysfunctional. But a light touch or tap is sufficient.

27:00 Bigger adjustments may be needed if the movement disrupts the student’s ability to understand where their body is and how it moves (i.e., arms overhead and how to externally and internally rotate the arms). If the teacher puts the student in the pose, then they haven’t learned anything.

29:00 May not be able to do the movement because they don’t have the neural pathways to do so. Students may not be aware of habitual movements and don’t know where there body is in those movements.

35:07 2nd toe lift: after warming up the toes, lift only the 2nd toe. Because most of us have worn shoes all of our life, we don’t have the neural pathways to move our toes individually. Doing the 2nd toe lift builds neural pathways (can help by having a finger lift up the toe) and then have to work on “training” to build strength to lift the toe without the finger.

35:45 Fine tuning our tactile touch. Just touching and gently moving the student to the extent that the student does not resist. Don’t push to the resistance and beyond – this is where injury can happen.

 

Contacts:

Email: journeytolight@gmail.com

Website: freelyhuman.com

FB: let.your.heart.sing

Jun 19, 2018

1:14 Introduction to Vinaya Saunders

1:50 Began with corporate yoga and was pregnant while she was teaching. Some female students became uncomfortable and didn’t come to class as the baby grew. One student said it was painful to see someone so pregnant as she had had great difficulty becoming pregnant. Vinaya started studying Gynocologic Ayurveda in depth and found what the ancient teachings said about fertility Western Medicine solves symptoms, rarely the root cause. Vinaya works with clients using the Ayurvedic practices to develop a healthy uterus, some of her clients have become pregnant and had healthy babies.

Birth control and infertility treatments affect the hormones in many ways and are deleterious to fertility. Pranyama is good for vata imbalances and many fertility issues are based in vata imbalances.

11:50 Vinaya likes to work with women in their 40’s because they have tried everything that Western Medicine has to offer and are looking beyond that paradigm. Western Medicine prescribes birth control pills for teenagers with heavy periods, women experiencing menopause and those with endometriosis. Long term use of birth control can have very deleterious affects on a women’s fertility.

14:45 Vinayam – a humble approach to yoga. Vinaya created this type of yoga based on specific poses for each day of the week. Each day of the week is associated with a planet in Hinduism. Each planet has different aspects and the yoga poses are chosen to support their aspects.

21:50 Vinaya’s journey from corporate yoga to fertility support. Her original training was for young people in their 20’s but her students needed a different kind of yoga. Started studying classical Ayurveda. She looked at fields where Western Medicine has few prescriptions to offer individuals like gynecology, dermatology, and obstetrics. She studied Ayurveda in great depth in these areas. Individuals need to understand the causes of their conditions/diseases not just the symptoms.

30:40 Western medicine works with fear so that people give up their body, mind and spirit to the doctor to fix. Gurus can do something similar; they want control also but use a person’s beliefs and trust. Each individual has to trust their own body, mind, spirit and find support for it to heal itself. And heredity has little effect on health, but rather the patterns of thought that have been passed down from parents or grandparents have more effect on health.

Contacts:

Website: www.vinayam.com

Email: vinayasaunders@gmail.com

FB: healhumbly

 

Jun 12, 2018

1:06 Introduction to Ashley Adams, owner of Fit Yoga Factory and author of “Zen and the Wonder Woman Complex” - a book to help mums build their tool kit for self-care.

2:12 Ashley defines building a community as creating a safe, comfortable space. Getting rid of whatever preconceptions someone may have of yoga teachers and yoga studios. She brings a real life perspective to yoga classes and yoga studios. She has a healthy mix of students from 13 to 73. Lots of moms that if they have to can bring their children to class so they don’t miss their yoga. Don’t have to be perfect, look perfect, or wear perfect yoga clothes. Her community helps her stay a real person. Its not a “perfectly perfect studio” or “perfectly perfect” yoga teachers, but rather real people who like yoga.

7:05 Ashley’s book – “Zen and the Wonder Women Complex” is the written version of what she is trying to achieve in the studio of being real and accepting that some days can be challenging. The book gives tips and tools on how to start each day with balance and intention.

9:15 Ashley started with online yoga classes (Leader of the Yoga Mom Rebellion) and many of her viewers asked where they could take classes with her in person.  So she explored starting a yoga studio in her hometown of Tarpon Springs, FL in the USA. She found a space and opened full time in February 2018. One of her unique classes is Wine Down Wednesday where they have a short class, drink some wine and share a potluck dinner. This can breakdown the perception of what a “yoga studio owner” is like to build a community of like-minded individuals.

13:30 Ashley’s tips on building community through a yoga studio: a) patience and b) accept that you are running a yoga studio and have two hats – a yoga hat and a business hat. Know the differences between those two and what are your strengths and weaknesses. Find others to help with your weaknesses while you use your strengths to build the studio and the business.

15:30 Started the studio because teaching a variety of venues, caused chaos in her life. She wanted to incorporate into her job the ability to fund her yoga dreams of continuing yoga education. She found a place to have the studio and she can do podcasts, classes and workshops, etc.,  out of one place. Wanted to stay in the yoga world instead of moving between the yoga world and the world of another job.

18:00 Ashley and her teachers have developed systems to allow anyone to take any class regardless of experience or ability. They try to direct people to appropriate classes: emphasising that the class is not ready for you yet instead of you aren’t able to do this class. They modify and work with anyone (including pre-class one on one’s) to help students find the safest way to do yoga in the class they want to attend. Acceptance is a subject brought up often to help people accept where their body is on the that day.

25:05 Ashley’s studio has multiple classes and 3-4 teachers. She started with a full, consistent schedule so that current and prospective students know she will be open and able to provide a variety of classes. Run’s regular hours 5:30 am to sometimes 9:30 pm on the weekdays and only one class on the weekends.

Contacts:

Website: www.fityogafactory.com

FB: fityogafactory

Instagram: fityogafactory

Twitter: fityogafactory

Periscope: ashleyadams1

Book: “Zen and the Wonder Women Complex” on Amazon and www.fityogafactory.com

 

Jun 5, 2018

1:23 Introduction of Nancy Candea and Yoga Impact

3:15: In 2009, moved from Hawaii to Boulder, Colorado USA. Wanted to teach more marginalised populations and give back. Started teaching in women’s shelter and a client helped her establish a non-profit charity.  In addition to providing yoga to marginalised communities, the charity also wanted to provide teacher training to individuals from these communities.

Nancy teaches at the VA at a women’s trauma unit (for those sexually assaulted in the military). As individuals left the program they asked Nancy for recommendations for where they could take yoga in their community. She didn’t know and started the Yoga Impact teacher training. Students will feel more comfortable if the teacher understands what the students have experienced. As a result, in 2017, Yoga Impact teacher training graduated 17 people of color and one week remains for the teacher training offered on the Navajo Reservation. Some trainees have already been teaching in the community.

Yoga Impact provides resources – both monetarily and other resources – for teachers that have a vision for their community that improves wellness. As an example, Nancy used to teach at the Boulder Women’s jail and when a student finished her sentence, she asked Nancy how she could take teacher training. Yoga Impact funder her training and she has taken over the yoga classes at the jail, works with the parole officers and others that provide support to help students with the transitions from jail to living on their own. 

9:45 Nancy and the board are currently expanding Yoga Impact’s vision to help support new teachers as they begin to teach in their communities. It may include financial support, mentoring, or training on how to be an entrepreneur to start wellness communities.

10:44 They want to expand the reach of Yoga Impact into more communities by working with small business, corporations, and entrepreneurs to expand their financial base.

13:50 There are a variety of sponsorships to support Yoga Impact: individual sponsorships, small business and corporate, and yoga studio sponsorships are available.

17:57 How to work with corporations or entrepreneurs. Providing a well thought out program that targets the corporation’s or entrepreneur’s community with a specific request that requires little corporate effort is often successful.

20:56 What is the contribution of Yoga Impact? There is a large community of connected people who want to serve – a network of people who want to reach out and be part of the upliftment of humankind.

 

Contacts:

Website: www.yogaimpact.org

Email: yogaimpact @gmail.com

FB: yogaimpact 501C3

Instagram: yogaimpact

May 29, 2018

1:05 Introduction of Caroline

2:20 Corporate Yoga – started as part of wellbeing programs in work place. Caroline was contacted to provide yoga classes and meditation courses. Some corporations are committed to their staff’s wellbeing but less common in last few years. Benefits to students and to the organisation. Company benefits include increasing profits through employee retention and improved employee output. Need a champion to talk to senior management about implementing the program and can also help with logistics. Co-contribution by staff reinforce commitment to attend.

10:20 Corporate classes: Caroline teaches them so that the postures, breathing and relaxation can be replicated in their offices, at home or while travelling. Teaches what the poses do – i.e., opening hips. All classes include work on the mat, standing, and in a chair. Pranyama and meditation.

13:00 Meditation – changed Caroline’s life. Due to health issues, wanted to improve her health and immune system. Asked Craig Hassad (a colleague) for information but he just told her to start meditating. Just 5 minutes to start and tell him how it was. Using meditation assisted in bringing her white blood cell count from zero to near normal. This led to completing teacher training and creating her own yoga studio. Realised climbing the corporate ladder wasn’t very fulfilling. She is now calmer, sleeps better, her problem-solving is better.

23:00 She has created a Japanese garden around her studio to create stillness and serenity.

25:18 Caroline’s study of yoga therapy and Ayurveda led her to realise that these two can help individuals with their issues. Hopes it will become an integral part of the health system.

 

Contact:

Email: caroline@experienceyoga.com.au

www.experienceyoga.com.au

FB and Instagram: experienceyoga

May 23, 2018

Diana Tokaji Part 2

Self-Care during Acute Trauma

 

1:00 Wrote a book “Six Women in a Cell” of her experience with assault by police. It isn’t a yoga therapy how-to, tells stories of the womens’ experience. Reader and listener share the experience. Story of what it takes to survive. It’s for any survivor and those that work with survivors.

5:20 Diana’s assault occurred three years ago. This time frame has allowed her to start speaking publicly. This and working with clients with similar problems requires a lot of self-care, emotional rebalancing and release.

7:00 Self Care Tips: what restores each of us comes from what we love. Soon after the assault took up boxing – contact, rhythm – really helped. She dances, moves, shares. Recommends that yoga therapists learn re-evaluation counselling where the counsellor is trained to be present, a quality listener to another person. Yoga therapists should be available to each other using this technique.

10:50 Presence is being sware of what the body is asking or trying to do. Learning what it really takes to be present. It is the best gift you can give anybody. In a session, visiting different scenes of Diana’s assault, I knew nobody wanted to hear about the assault, or what I went through. When the therapists described the defeat she saw in me, the dam broke and I talked about it. The yoga therapists held the space while those scenes replayed.

16:03 Diana’s book Six Women in a Cell telling the story of her assault experience is written with only a few edits remaining. Then she will be looking for an agent and publisher. The performance based on the book is another avenue for the story. Perfomance was a carrot for Diana’s  GoFundMe site to fund writing the book. The GoFundMe has been successful in providing funds. (See resources for the finding the site if you would like to donate.)

21:30 The physical aspect in yoga therapy (e.g., mudras) are very helpful. Pull, press, push the hands and the being registers the courage needed in life. Creates a sense of tone; translates to the mental and emotional states. The physical practices are equally important.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

www.GoFundMe.com  search for Diana Tokaji

May 7, 2018

Diana Tokaji Part 1

Acute Trauma

1:10 Introduction to Diana Tokaji

2:16 Acute Stage of Trauma following assault. Acute state can appear at any stage to life. Some of the go too’s of yoga therapy may not be appropriate but may put the body in danger. Body may need to rally to face challenges of acute state. Acute stage is survival state. “Yoga Therapy Today” Winter, 2018, Diana’s article  recommend rest and relaxation for PTSD and trauma. But body may be in acute stage which is a state of survival which is the right state for the body to be in. Putting it into relaxation can drop the body into freeze state which could be dangerous.

 

9:00 Aspects of Diana’s protocol for acute trauma: vigilance, head-centered, legs parallel, close chain, quads and glute engaged, eyes open, heels on the ground. Vigilance = be able to see all around, can scope your horizons. If client wants to be in relaxation pose, Diana may offer to be vigilant for them. These aspects meet the body’s need to watch out for danger.

15:00 Presence is needed to know what is required for a client in that moment. Yoga therapists and teachers may have too shallow a knowledge of trauma. Have to meet the wisdom of the sympathetic NS. This approach gives another frame with a client with acute trauma. These ideas are becoming more well-known and accepted.

19:45 “I teach courage, physically and emotionally. I always reject shame. I offer specific cues and direction to rally muscle as well as mind support.” Fear can be overwhelming. Need executive function to deal with the aftermath of an assault –legal, medical, relationship, etc. Plus fear of the assaulter returning. Trauma is like a rupture of your being.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

 

May 6, 2018

Dayna Culwell – Yoga for Chronic Pain

1:30 Introduction to Dayna Culwell

3:08 Using yoga to interrupt the pain signals. Alert from brain that there is pain and something be done. Sometimes the pain signals become mixed and that the wound that originally caused the pain is healed but the pain continues. The brain needs to be reset. Start with grounding and breathing. Can redirect the pain signals if you can learn a strong focus through yoga; readjust pain signals so that you don’t notice them (as much) or reset so that the brain stops sending false pain signals. Reground: pain makes us lose perspective, power of pain is very strong (survival mechanism). Reground: connecting with the earth (i.e., child pose).

13:00 Chronic Pain Programs in Hospitals: Dayna’s teacher developed and taught the physicians of the hospital. Seeing the value, the physicians helped implement the program. Leads to better recuperation because yoga can address the changes due to the emotional impact of the illness and treatment. Program includes grounding and breathing based on the kosha model, start with physical body and then go through the rest of the koshas.

20:00 Has started meeting 60+ women in their homes and them yoga to meet the student’s goals. Together they create a yoga space in the student’s home so that they have a place to practice. Discuss things like where can you keep your props, do you have a clear wall space, how will the space work? This increases compliance with the practice that Dayna designs for each student. She is also seeing clients in nursing homes and working with people with dementia. She uses music, talks softly, has a kind expression and the students start to positively react to that and follow her movements. Caregivers at the home may also take the class next to their client which is beneficial for both.

29:00 Dayna is very interested in and wants to interact with others on the subject of yoga for scoliosis. She would like to hear from others that may want to do a project on using yoga to help those with scoliosis.

Contact Details:

Email: yogawithdayna@gmail.com

Website: yogawithdayna.net

FB: yogawithdayna

 yoga

May 1, 2018

Trauma Explained

1:12 Introduction to Nityda Gessal

4:15 When is yoga appropriate for someone in trauma. Need tools when beginning therapy or yoga. Touch can be a trigger for people with trauma. Get permission to touch several times during class.

Need referral list for therapists for students. Yoga is “yoga therapy lite”. If students  describe behaviours of hurting themselves or others, tell you their trauma history, then a yoga teacher should give them a referral for a therapist or if in therapy to see their therapist.

13:32 Teaches trauma informed yoga for therapists and teachers. Therapists are accepting of yoga; accepting of alternative modalities. Therapists understand that trauma is held in the body, right side of the brain and trauma work needs to include movement. Trauma is held in the right side of the brain but fragmented = fragmented, intrusive thoughts. Traditional talk therapy is left brained and can’t reach the trauma. Need to access the right brain, creativity, movement. Yoga integrates the right and left brain. Intrusive thoughts are all right brained and need to integrate the logical, rational left brain to understand the thoughts.

18:30 Yoga movement to help trauma as opposed to restorative yoga. Holding in restorative yoga is so long allows intrusive thoughts. People need to feel sensation in the body, perhaps yin yoga which holds to feel sensation in the body is conducive to healing trauma. People need to move through their trauma. Keep talking keep them present in restorative poses.

22:06 Trauma-informed training for yoga teachers. Significant education about what is trauma, prevalence (in a class of 25, 3 will have diagnoses of PTSD and 15 will have trauma issues), how is trauma stored in the Nervous System and the brain, trauma therapies and referrals. Invitational language, sensitive to issues of trauma survivors. Important for teachers to have knowledge of the trauma informed approach.

30:00 Nityda has started creating and posting trauma focussed youtube videos. Yoga practices for trauma.

Contact:

Nityda@talkwithnityda.com

www.traumaconscious.com

You Tube Videos – google Nityda Gessal

Resources: The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel Van Der Kolk.

Apr 24, 2018

1:45 Introduction to Courtney Kilian

2:40 Writing and Yoga - Kilian found that yoga and writing  complemented each other and were therapeutic in her experience.

4:40 Benefits of yoga and writing for students – a) helps them get through their blocks, b) uses chakras as part of the course,  c) students begin to understand that creativity is not a luxury, d) yoga has the body releases the blocks that prevent creativity, d) use meditation and breathing as bridges between everyday life and the yoga space. Yoga puts them in the present.

11:42 Developed an online course to be launched June 2018 consisting of: gentle yoga, mindfulness, breath, meditation. Movement to get to know the body, each week work on a chakra, meeting students where they are at, and teaching them to find out where they are at, then restorative yoga. Teacher is just the guide, your body tells you what you need to know.

15:25 Class starts with an intention, mantra and meditation on arrival. Use journal prompts about how body feels, and what are blocks. Encouraged to really notice what is happening when student moved, breathed, meditated. Courtney started this after a severe car accident with a head injury. Her former preferred yoga – power yoga – was no longer accessible and she had cognitive issues. Going back to the basics in both yoga and writing helped her have a conversation with her body and helped her recovery.

20:00 Migraines started after the injury which would incapacitate her. Started an online course for migraine sufferers which includes education to find your triggers for a migraine, and to dampen the symptoms from getting worse. Exercise can trigger migraines so have to have very gentle movements, have a conversation with the body to see how that felt, learning what is acceptable. Poor posture and hormonal imbalances can also trigger migraines. Yoga can help with these also.

24:35 Yoga is such a beautiful practice; if you can breathe, you can do yoga.

 

Contacts:

Email: c.amberkilian@gmail.com

Website: www.on-and-ink.com (where you can sign up for her newsletter)

FB: on.ink.inspired

Yoga for Migraines: http://omandink.com/video-and-e-book/

Yoga for Writers: http://omandink.com/yoga-for-writers

 

Apr 17, 2018

1:11 Introduction of Jean Di Carlo-Wagner

3:56 Created a class for people in treatment for cancer, long term survivorship, and in transition. She was diagnosed with cancer and could find no suitable yoga classes as she went through the stages of cancer treatment.

Students are all laying down for the entire class. Yoga allows people to deal with the emotional aspects of the diagnosis or living with a chronic disease. Allows them to decompress. 60% of people diagnosed with cancer will have a re-occurrence. They become chronic patients then and need to manage their nervous system as they go through the process. Yoga provides equanimity as it has the most tools to help and makes the most impact. The ripples of the diagnosis last for a long time, often resulting a many stress-related issues. There is nothing that yoga can’t make a little better.

13:00 Benefits for students – class concentrates on breathing fully and naturally. People in stress often have constricted breathing. Makes space for people that are in some form of healing, it provides community, and cancer often motivates people to have a healthier lifestyle of which yoga is one aspect.

21:50 Witness – a non-judgemental look at ourselves, accepting our bodies as they are now, notice what is happening without attaching emotions. Jean gives a one minute witnessing meditation that she often uses in class.

22:30 Class begins with students that want to introducing themselves and what their bodies need. Language is very invitational asking people to move in any way that their body can do easily. Class usually consists of 25 minutes of stretching, 25 minutes of meditation, and 15 minutes of breathing.

Medical doctors are more accepting of yoga as part of the treatment for healing from cancer but do want valid research about yoga in this role. Research in yoga is changing from surviving cancer to the quality of life in the journey. Recent research which is more valid than older research shows that yoga is the safest and best for the majority of students in a class for people with cancer or surviving.

40:45 Transition – Jean brings the classes breathing and meditation aspects to the student’s home that can no longer attend class. Yoga allows space for discussing what is eternal in us; what transforms but does not die. Yoga helps us “walk each other home”. Helps other students in the class accept the death of a former student.

43:45 Yoga for Healing Phone Call – once a month Jean posts the date on FB for the monthly phone call which is very similar to the class.

48:40 Jean has uploaded 52 meditations on her website (www.yogabeing.net). This is her legacy to produce content that will be of use to others with chronic diseases or those that enjoy the meditations.

Contact details:

Website: www.yogabeing.net

Email: yogaforcancersurvivors@cox.net

FB, Insta, Vimeo, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Alignable: Jean Di Carlo-Wagner

Twitter: JeandW

Sound-Cloud.com – Yoga Being

Apr 10, 2018

1:12 Lara Benusis Introduction

1:40 Yoga Research Protocols - Lara developed protocols for departments at Sloan Kettering. She also was a subject of research projects when she was at university. She also dropped out of one which gives her insight into the issue of keeping subjects continuing with the research study. Can give incentives, but incentives have to be acceptable to a wide variety of subjects for the research results to be applicable to the whole population that is being studied. Developing protocols is a collaborative effort which has positive and negative aspects. 1st step is literature review to look at what yoga research and other movement research has studied on the research question. 

13:120 Medically trained and Ph.D.'s are becoming much more accepting of good quality yoga research and yoga in general but they need the expertise of experienced yoga teachers to add to the protocols developed. Lara is constantly applying the concepts learned from research to her teaching and research.

17:00 Yoga teachers generally have low interest in yoga research. Lara is contemplating a Facebook group like a book group to read and discuss yoga research. Wants to share her expertise to other yoga teachers. She speaks up about misuses of research (e.g., yoga (mats) cause plantar warts which led to cleaning yoga mats after every use) but this was based on 5 instances of yoga students having plantar warts among a podiatrist' s clientele. However the cause of the warts was not definitively yoga - could have been many things. 

26:00 Yoga teachers also need to be more collaborative because if they don't they have to be a expert at everything. Teaching basic yoga may not need as much collaboration but when teaching students with health issues it becomes very important.

Contacts:

email: lbenusis@yahoo.com

Facebook: facebook.com/Larayogaluv

Insta: #Larayogaluv

Twitter: @Larayogaluv

 

Apr 3, 2018

1:26 Lara Benusis Introduction - Has been teaching yoga since 1996. Was recruited by Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer center as a yoga teacher and researcher. 

6:15 Takes years to understand research and design of research. Quantitative research is data driven - reduces to numbers. Qualitative research is telling the story. Yoga teachers are qualitative researchers as they note what is happening with the body, during movement, breath and meditation. 

9:21 Yoga research vs. generic research. Questions about yoga can sometimes be answered with other kinds of movement or rehabilitation research(e.g., exercise oncology).

Research is reductive; can only at this time measure or describe the components (movement, breathing, meditation) of yoga, not the whole yoga experience.

First step in research is literature review to see what has already been done in yoga and other complementary areas asking similar questions.  Don't want to replicate completed research.

16:36 Differences between the Western and Eastern approach to yoga research. Data driven vs. experiential. Karen Sherman was the first significant (Western) researcher to research yoga's benefits. Her study was about back pain and compared yoga intervention to standard treatment at the time. Put yoga on the evidence-based map. 

Research pushes the conversation forward, but can't answer all of the questions. Parts of yoga will be missed because of the reductive nature of research. But different research projects can help shine a light on different aspects of yoga.

email: lbenusis@yahoo.com

Facebook http://facebook.com/lara.benusis

Twitter: @LarayogaLuv

Mar 28, 2018

1:45 Introduction of Melanie Klein

3:36 In 2002, yoga culture changed. Big corporations bought yoga studios, the phenomenon of "yoga celebrities" began, advertising changed. Yoga advertising started following the lead of fitness, beauty and fashion industries. There was money to be made.

7:55 Few talking about this cultural change. The discussion of how to present another face of yoga has grown exponentially since 2010. But yoga is still being commercialised.

9:53 To change a culture, storytelling is powerful. Although what you hear is not in your experience, it can generate empathy and a willingess to be part of the discussion. It emphasises the "humanity" of people and makes it easier to see points of connection. 

12:31 How do we bring the corporations into the discussion? There has been some success discussing these issues with the yoga magazines. But there are constraints on corporations in how they can react to these points. Convincing them that there is still a profit in not replicating the existing models (fitness, beauty, fashion) First step is to have discussions between the grass roots trying and corporations.

17:00 Yoga and Body Image Coalition gave visibility to many people working on their own to expand the perception of yoga. It was created 4 years ago to aggregate these individual efforts to increase reach.

26:10 New Book: Yoga Rising: Stories of Yoga Renegades. The conversation was not complete after the 1st book was published. the 1st book - Yoga and Body Image - told the stories of the benefits accruing to individuals using yoga to gain body acceptance. Book II: Yoga Rising is critiques of business and cultural models in yoga or who do you become when you reach body acceptance. 

Book III:  will have the theme of yoga's effects on trauma and grief. How yoga helps with the adversities in our lives.

29:55 Advice for Yoga Today?  Really step deeply inside their practice to see if their life reflects their yoga practice. How have you taken your yoga off the mat?

Contact:

Instagram: #ybicoalition, #melmelklein

Books websites:

www.yogaandbodyimage.org

www.yogarising.com 

(and you can access free downloads to guide discussions about these issues in your community for both books.

www.ybicoalition.com 

www.melaniecklein.com (available soon)

www.ybicoalition.com/support provides the only source of funding of the coalition (really nice t-shirts with ybicoalition tag lines)

 

 

Mar 21, 2018

1:15 Introduction to Michael Lee

2:15 Michael explains why he has more faith in yoga than ever before. Mental health workers and therapists are now taking yoga therapy training as they see the benefits. Neuroscience research is now supporting the body/mind connection. Research on consciousness. Helping people come into the present and become aware of their own insights.

8:30 In the 1980's there was a great flourishing of yoga therapy (Dean Ornish's study on reversing heart disease with lifestyle changes including yoga, Michael Lee began Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy and the International Association of Yoga Therapists began in 1989.) Michael explains his own deep experience with yoga that led to some important insights that he carried with him since he was a child. Michael and other well-known yogis knew that yoga could help even if they didn't know why. 

17:05 About 10 years ago, neuroscience and psychological research started explaining why yoga can help people change. The connection of neuroscience, psychology, yoga philosophy, and Buddhism/mindfulness began to explain what everyone was experiencing.

18:42 The changes in Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy training over the years. Started as very experiential and has gradually added knowledge components as the research start's clarifying the results of the experiential learning. 

21:16 Michael recently talked to astronauts about the overview effect. As astronauts contemplate the earth when they are in space, they begin to change. They understand that there is one small blue marble that all of us live on and they become much more interested in environmental causes, or philanthropy because they understand the world's fragility.

25:38 What is the future of yoga? Yoga therapy is becoming much more accepted in the medical realm as it becomes a modality for helping cancer surgical patients recover and to help with the changes needed in patients and their caregivers.

Huge increase in interest in yoga therapy in Japan.

30:00 Difference between yoga and yoga therapy. In essence there is little difference but in practice yoga therapy requires deeper knowledge and the skills are quite different.

Contact: 

Email: michael@pyrt.com

Website: www.pyrt.com

Resources:

Bessel Van de Kolk: The Body Keeps Score

Stephen Porges: Polyvagal Theory www.stephenporges.com

Bruce Ecker: Memory Reconciliation to Facilitate Change www.coherencetherapy.com

Lorenzo Cohen: www.vyasahouston/yoga-research/yoga-for-cancer

 

Mar 13, 2018

1:14 - Introduction of Siv Havik

2:37 - Students mostly pay the donation minimum but a few do pay more as they can.  Norway's good economy and support makes it possible for some to donate more.

6:15: Siv began the studio because she could not afford to go to yoga classes as much as she wanted to and she has a strong desire to provide diversity in her town regarding yoga. She wanted to make it possible for everyone that may be interested in participating in yoga to find a place to do so. They have several 1000 members now.

9:00 Teachers come to Siv to volunteer their time and Siv has not had to recruit teachers. Siv was the original teacher and she taught two classes with a donation-based focus. She rented a space for each class and only had to cover the cost of the rent for each class. As the concept grew, Siv acquired a space for the donation-based studio and teachers began volunteering to give classes in their specialties. So their schedule is very diverse with many different yoga specialties and different times. It remains donation based and the donations are used to maintain the studio. One offering is medical yoga which is more accepted as a modality to help those recovering or for certain illnesses. 

14:30 - As the studio processes were put into place and many things became routine, Siv found she had extra capacity. She decided to start the first Yoga Festival in her town of Stavanger, Norway. All the proceeds go to charities to stop child marriage and sex slavery. There are villages in Nepal that are just brothels and children work in these brothels. Siv and the studio work with charities that provide orphanages for these children or work with very poor villages that sell their children to pimps. The charity provides schools and help for these villages. 

18:30 - Benefits to the community of the donation-based model. It allows a lot of people that wouldn't consider yoga classes because of the cost to access yoga. It creates diversity as many different kinds of yoga are offered by different teachers teaching their specialties. Classes are offered at diverse times. The studio, according to Siv, belongs to the students as much to Siv and the other teachers. 

What are the critical aspects to have a functioning donation-based studio: a) teachers work as volunteers, b) donation-based costs and c) diversity of offerings and class times. Siv also suggests that at the beginning start with a small number of classes and low cost for rent, etc.

33:28 Siv's dream is to have donation-based studios spread to other places and countries. If anyone would like to start a donation-based studio, Siv offers to be a resource to them to help them get started.

Contacts:

email: naanorskkurs@gmail.com

website: www.yogastavanger.no

FB: www.facebook.com/yogastavanger/

Mar 7, 2018

1:26 Introduction of Kristen Krash

3:17 What is/was yoga to her when she was a student, a teacher and now working on her dream of an ecologically sustainable eco-lodge in Ecuador

19:50 Currently there is a varnish/shellac covering yoga based on the corporate business model. Optimistically, Kristen feels that parts of yoga are really worth saving and we have to dig a little deeper to find it. Yoga Alliance just adds to the varnish.

35:30 Now teaching yoga at Sueno de Vida , the eco-lodge in Ecuador. From just a piece of cloud forest, they have built a guest lodge, communal kitchen, bathroom and have a large organic garden, fruit trees and spring. She is doing less asanas, more practices to focus and building a community.

Contacts: 

email: info@suenodevida.org

website: www.suenodevida.org

FB suenodevida

 

 

Feb 28, 2018

1:18 Introduction

3:00 Preventing disease through yoga and other healthy lifestyles. Explore different healing themes in Andrea's yoga classes. Observation in Andrea's interactive class as the student's are taught how to practice  their yoga at home. Teach them to explore a ujique healthy lifestyle that meets their needs. Uses svasana as a way for the class's movements and breath to sink into the body to remember better what occurred. 

7:48 Andrea starts with a lesson plan based on current research into the best yoga practices for health. She participates on FB groups looking at the nexus of yoga and health to keep her knowledge fresh.  

10:20 Proper nutrition can improve chronic conditions. Although some improvements may be seen with an improved meals for Alzheimer's patients, developing meals with few carbohydrates and sugars will help the children of these patients. Current research considers Alzheimer's a form of diabetes - essentially diabetes of the brain. Without the ability to make insulin work properly (and unable to process carbs and sugars well), the brain is starved for energy. 

19:00 Yoga teacher's become a source of information for their students and must have significant knowledge in the areas they teach. No 21 year old can understand the needs or goals of a 59 year old in a yoga class. Their bodies are too different.

24:45 Heart of a yogi; every teacher should have the heart of a yogi. Yoga is a practice for life; everything that happens on the mat will translate into useful information in the rest of life.

Contact:

email: andrea@heavenlanecreation.com

website: http://www.heavelanecreation.com

FB: facebook.com/Heavenlanecreation

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Heavenlanetrank

Instagram: https://instagram.com/Hevenlanecreatitons

Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/atrank

Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/andreatrank

Google +: https://googleplus.com/heavenlane by Andrea Trank

1 2 Next »