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Changing the Face of Yoga Podcast

Hosted by Stephanie Cunningham, a yoga teacher herself who is committed to sharing yoga with anyone, especially the over 50's. Stephanie created this podcast to share how yoga can be practiced by anyone with amazing benefits. Yoga teachers themselves will share their stories; discussing why they teach, who they teach, how students benefit. Every fortnight or so, we will release a new episode. We will talk with teachers about teaching children, curvy bodies, the elderly but also those that each yoga to support students with diabetes, cancer and mental health issues.
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Now displaying: Page 1
May 7, 2018

Diana Tokaji Part 1

Acute Trauma

1:10 Introduction to Diana Tokaji

2:16 Acute Stage of Trauma following assault. Acute state can appear at any stage to life. Some of the go too’s of yoga therapy may not be appropriate but may put the body in danger. Body may need to rally to face challenges of acute state. Acute stage is survival state. “Yoga Therapy Today” Winter, 2018, Diana’s article  recommend rest and relaxation for PTSD and trauma. But body may be in acute stage which is a state of survival which is the right state for the body to be in. Putting it into relaxation can drop the body into freeze state which could be dangerous.

 

9:00 Aspects of Diana’s protocol for acute trauma: vigilance, head-centered, legs parallel, close chain, quads and glute engaged, eyes open, heels on the ground. Vigilance = be able to see all around, can scope your horizons. If client wants to be in relaxation pose, Diana may offer to be vigilant for them. These aspects meet the body’s need to watch out for danger.

15:00 Presence is needed to know what is required for a client in that moment. Yoga therapists and teachers may have too shallow a knowledge of trauma. Have to meet the wisdom of the sympathetic NS. This approach gives another frame with a client with acute trauma. These ideas are becoming more well-known and accepted.

19:45 “I teach courage, physically and emotionally. I always reject shame. I offer specific cues and direction to rally muscle as well as mind support.” Fear can be overwhelming. Need executive function to deal with the aftermath of an assault –legal, medical, relationship, etc. Plus fear of the assaulter returning. Trauma is like a rupture of your being.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

 

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