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Changing the Face of Yoga Podcast

Hosted by Stephanie Cunningham, a yoga teacher herself who is committed to sharing yoga with anyone, especially the over 50's. Stephanie created this podcast to share how yoga can be practiced by anyone with amazing benefits. Yoga teachers themselves will share their stories; discussing why they teach, who they teach, how students benefit. Every fortnight or so, we will release a new episode. We will talk with teachers about teaching children, curvy bodies, the elderly but also those that each yoga to support students with diabetes, cancer and mental health issues.
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Now displaying: May, 2018
May 29, 2018

1:05 Introduction of Caroline

2:20 Corporate Yoga – started as part of wellbeing programs in work place. Caroline was contacted to provide yoga classes and meditation courses. Some corporations are committed to their staff’s wellbeing but less common in last few years. Benefits to students and to the organisation. Company benefits include increasing profits through employee retention and improved employee output. Need a champion to talk to senior management about implementing the program and can also help with logistics. Co-contribution by staff reinforce commitment to attend.

10:20 Corporate classes: Caroline teaches them so that the postures, breathing and relaxation can be replicated in their offices, at home or while travelling. Teaches what the poses do – i.e., opening hips. All classes include work on the mat, standing, and in a chair. Pranyama and meditation.

13:00 Meditation – changed Caroline’s life. Due to health issues, wanted to improve her health and immune system. Asked Craig Hassad (a colleague) for information but he just told her to start meditating. Just 5 minutes to start and tell him how it was. Using meditation assisted in bringing her white blood cell count from zero to near normal. This led to completing teacher training and creating her own yoga studio. Realised climbing the corporate ladder wasn’t very fulfilling. She is now calmer, sleeps better, her problem-solving is better.

23:00 She has created a Japanese garden around her studio to create stillness and serenity.

25:18 Caroline’s study of yoga therapy and Ayurveda led her to realise that these two can help individuals with their issues. Hopes it will become an integral part of the health system.

 

Contact:

Email: caroline@experienceyoga.com.au

www.experienceyoga.com.au

FB and Instagram: experienceyoga

May 23, 2018

Diana Tokaji Part 2

Self-Care during Acute Trauma

 

1:00 Wrote a book “Six Women in a Cell” of her experience with assault by police. It isn’t a yoga therapy how-to, tells stories of the womens’ experience. Reader and listener share the experience. Story of what it takes to survive. It’s for any survivor and those that work with survivors.

5:20 Diana’s assault occurred three years ago. This time frame has allowed her to start speaking publicly. This and working with clients with similar problems requires a lot of self-care, emotional rebalancing and release.

7:00 Self Care Tips: what restores each of us comes from what we love. Soon after the assault took up boxing – contact, rhythm – really helped. She dances, moves, shares. Recommends that yoga therapists learn re-evaluation counselling where the counsellor is trained to be present, a quality listener to another person. Yoga therapists should be available to each other using this technique.

10:50 Presence is being sware of what the body is asking or trying to do. Learning what it really takes to be present. It is the best gift you can give anybody. In a session, visiting different scenes of Diana’s assault, I knew nobody wanted to hear about the assault, or what I went through. When the therapists described the defeat she saw in me, the dam broke and I talked about it. The yoga therapists held the space while those scenes replayed.

16:03 Diana’s book Six Women in a Cell telling the story of her assault experience is written with only a few edits remaining. Then she will be looking for an agent and publisher. The performance based on the book is another avenue for the story. Perfomance was a carrot for Diana’s  GoFundMe site to fund writing the book. The GoFundMe has been successful in providing funds. (See resources for the finding the site if you would like to donate.)

21:30 The physical aspect in yoga therapy (e.g., mudras) are very helpful. Pull, press, push the hands and the being registers the courage needed in life. Creates a sense of tone; translates to the mental and emotional states. The physical practices are equally important.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

www.GoFundMe.com  search for Diana Tokaji

May 7, 2018

Diana Tokaji Part 1

Acute Trauma

1:10 Introduction to Diana Tokaji

2:16 Acute Stage of Trauma following assault. Acute state can appear at any stage to life. Some of the go too’s of yoga therapy may not be appropriate but may put the body in danger. Body may need to rally to face challenges of acute state. Acute stage is survival state. “Yoga Therapy Today” Winter, 2018, Diana’s article  recommend rest and relaxation for PTSD and trauma. But body may be in acute stage which is a state of survival which is the right state for the body to be in. Putting it into relaxation can drop the body into freeze state which could be dangerous.

 

9:00 Aspects of Diana’s protocol for acute trauma: vigilance, head-centered, legs parallel, close chain, quads and glute engaged, eyes open, heels on the ground. Vigilance = be able to see all around, can scope your horizons. If client wants to be in relaxation pose, Diana may offer to be vigilant for them. These aspects meet the body’s need to watch out for danger.

15:00 Presence is needed to know what is required for a client in that moment. Yoga therapists and teachers may have too shallow a knowledge of trauma. Have to meet the wisdom of the sympathetic NS. This approach gives another frame with a client with acute trauma. These ideas are becoming more well-known and accepted.

19:45 “I teach courage, physically and emotionally. I always reject shame. I offer specific cues and direction to rally muscle as well as mind support.” Fear can be overwhelming. Need executive function to deal with the aftermath of an assault –legal, medical, relationship, etc. Plus fear of the assaulter returning. Trauma is like a rupture of your being.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

 

May 6, 2018

Dayna Culwell – Yoga for Chronic Pain

1:30 Introduction to Dayna Culwell

3:08 Using yoga to interrupt the pain signals. Alert from brain that there is pain and something be done. Sometimes the pain signals become mixed and that the wound that originally caused the pain is healed but the pain continues. The brain needs to be reset. Start with grounding and breathing. Can redirect the pain signals if you can learn a strong focus through yoga; readjust pain signals so that you don’t notice them (as much) or reset so that the brain stops sending false pain signals. Reground: pain makes us lose perspective, power of pain is very strong (survival mechanism). Reground: connecting with the earth (i.e., child pose).

13:00 Chronic Pain Programs in Hospitals: Dayna’s teacher developed and taught the physicians of the hospital. Seeing the value, the physicians helped implement the program. Leads to better recuperation because yoga can address the changes due to the emotional impact of the illness and treatment. Program includes grounding and breathing based on the kosha model, start with physical body and then go through the rest of the koshas.

20:00 Has started meeting 60+ women in their homes and them yoga to meet the student’s goals. Together they create a yoga space in the student’s home so that they have a place to practice. Discuss things like where can you keep your props, do you have a clear wall space, how will the space work? This increases compliance with the practice that Dayna designs for each student. She is also seeing clients in nursing homes and working with people with dementia. She uses music, talks softly, has a kind expression and the students start to positively react to that and follow her movements. Caregivers at the home may also take the class next to their client which is beneficial for both.

29:00 Dayna is very interested in and wants to interact with others on the subject of yoga for scoliosis. She would like to hear from others that may want to do a project on using yoga to help those with scoliosis.

Contact Details:

Email: yogawithdayna@gmail.com

Website: yogawithdayna.net

FB: yogawithdayna

 yoga

May 1, 2018

Trauma Explained

1:12 Introduction to Nityda Gessal

4:15 When is yoga appropriate for someone in trauma. Need tools when beginning therapy or yoga. Touch can be a trigger for people with trauma. Get permission to touch several times during class.

Need referral list for therapists for students. Yoga is “yoga therapy lite”. If students  describe behaviours of hurting themselves or others, tell you their trauma history, then a yoga teacher should give them a referral for a therapist or if in therapy to see their therapist.

13:32 Teaches trauma informed yoga for therapists and teachers. Therapists are accepting of yoga; accepting of alternative modalities. Therapists understand that trauma is held in the body, right side of the brain and trauma work needs to include movement. Trauma is held in the right side of the brain but fragmented = fragmented, intrusive thoughts. Traditional talk therapy is left brained and can’t reach the trauma. Need to access the right brain, creativity, movement. Yoga integrates the right and left brain. Intrusive thoughts are all right brained and need to integrate the logical, rational left brain to understand the thoughts.

18:30 Yoga movement to help trauma as opposed to restorative yoga. Holding in restorative yoga is so long allows intrusive thoughts. People need to feel sensation in the body, perhaps yin yoga which holds to feel sensation in the body is conducive to healing trauma. People need to move through their trauma. Keep talking keep them present in restorative poses.

22:06 Trauma-informed training for yoga teachers. Significant education about what is trauma, prevalence (in a class of 25, 3 will have diagnoses of PTSD and 15 will have trauma issues), how is trauma stored in the Nervous System and the brain, trauma therapies and referrals. Invitational language, sensitive to issues of trauma survivors. Important for teachers to have knowledge of the trauma informed approach.

30:00 Nityda has started creating and posting trauma focussed youtube videos. Yoga practices for trauma.

Contact:

Nityda@talkwithnityda.com

www.traumaconscious.com

You Tube Videos – google Nityda Gessal

Resources: The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel Van Der Kolk.

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