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Changing the Face of Yoga Podcast

Hosted by Stephanie Cunningham, a yoga teacher herself who is committed to sharing yoga with anyone, especially the over 50's. Stephanie created this podcast to share how yoga can be practiced by anyone with amazing benefits. Yoga teachers themselves will share their stories; discussing why they teach, who they teach, how students benefit. Every fortnight or so, we will release a new episode. We will talk with teachers about teaching children, curvy bodies, the elderly but also those that each yoga to support students with diabetes, cancer and mental health issues.
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Now displaying: March, 2019
Mar 27, 2019

Introduction

2:32 Yoga research occurring for a while, but so many people participating in yoga, it has grown.  Populations are using it for health benefits so researchers are looking at its effects, benefits. Started growing last few decades and will continue expanding in next decades. Patients took yoga for symptom management and told their doctors. Clinical researchers started researching these claims. Research in exercise science, mental health, and occupational therapy contributed to the knowledge.

6:42 Immigration changes brought new ideas to West; people started going to yoga in NYC because of 9/11 and people in Japan started attending more because the tsunami. Japan has the largest growth to date, but China will overtake that rate soon. Why do people gravitate to this method of self-care.

10:15 Youtube has lots of yoga, but people still need connection and study with a teacher. 10 years ago – video markets were lucrative, now its clothing and supplements.

11:54 How is yoga information disseminated and valued? Learning from different teachers and different lineages. This is changing as more people take courses/classes online. Some groups in yoga want to preserve info in lineages, others are wanting info that is evidence-based. Traditions will be valued, but seeing a radical change as people see the results of research.. Research is becoming more refined. Push back from traditional yoga, but understandings change as research brings new concepts. Research changes what we do in our practices based on perceived benefits. Many are coming from research

15:50 What am I gaining from yoga; what does it do? Steffany Moonaz researching chronic pain in underserved populations. Have no experience with yoga but know it is supposed to be good for them. Very motivated to learn yoga to help their health.

17:40 Personal experience; what happens if you stop doing yoga after years of practicing. Missed group connection, a level of calm, body just feels better with yoga. Tried yoga in combination with other exercises and yoga alone. Vigorous yoga vs gentle yoga for cancer patients. Research now is what is the best way to achieve our goal.

19:50 What is yoga? What is providing the benefits of the many aspects of yoga. Individual/combined benefits. What are different effects from different types of yoga. Yoga began with yogis experimenting on themselves and watching/reviewing what happens to their bodies, minds. Majority of Western practitioners are women. Yoga started as a male activity. How has yoga changed because of the change in the participants gender?  Yoga makes us feel better/ take care ourselves. Women are usually the health decision makers for the family. How has this huge increase in yoga affected population health and family health? Predict aging issues to find activities to have a healthy older age. Look longitudinally at life span and see what health activities are needed at different stages.

28:08 How powerful is the effect of teachers? External feedback to propel our growth – can be life changing. Participating in yoga remotely has deficits. Being witnessed and in person contact is powerful in yoga. Can’t be captured by research.

30:18 Research will radically change what we do in yoga. But need more research literacy. Both research and the yoga community can be blinded to what the other can offer. Need to bridge these different viewpoints.

31:49 Research is being refined: looking at different aspects of yoga, different lineages. Non communicable diseases are now the leading cause of death. How do we address that. Must be proactive in health behaviours – yoga can be the entry into physical activity, stress relief. But it is not for every issue. Can yoga be wide and deep enough to meet the needs of different populations – need different approaches. Do we change the name of yoga if it gets too far from its roots. Hold a place for different approaches.

34:02 What are our deficits in understanding as yoga teachers. Have a depth of experience but need to have research literacy to understand and apply the research findings Cross-collaboration between yoga teachers and researchers. Need a platform for day-to-day teachers to share their knowledge/experience. Ranking value of knowledge should not only be measured by degrees or social media followings. Lara has started a FB group Yoga Research Club where she posts a research paper and the members discuss it.

Contact Details
FB: yogaresearchclub

Insta: larayogaluv

Twitter: larayogaluv

Mar 20, 2019

 

Introduction Michael de Manincor and the Yoga Institute

2:55 Why is yoga for mental health becoming more prominent? Yoga makes people feel good, beyond what another type of exercise might produce. People realise yoga has tangible benefits on mood status, stress levels. Word of mouth about benefits. Health professionals go to yoga classes and realise the benefits for themselves. Research is backing up these benefits.

6:00 Increase in medical industry accepting yoga in mental health. Will take some time to be widespread as entrenched, sceptical of change.

7:18 Yoga teacher training not addressing yoga for mental health generally. Short courses are not enough for a basically trained teacher Short courses are good for personal experience. To teach yoga in general must be confident and competent; true for yoga and mental health also. Current 200 hour training is not sufficient for sufficient knowledge on mental health issues in a yoga class. A lot of students in general yoga classes have mental health issues.

11:45 Challenging for a basic trained yoga teacher to address students with mental health issues.

14:23 Former President and Life Member of Yoga Australia. Yoga Australia is very open to looking at the content and length of basic yoga teacher training. Have for some years required 350 hours of training within a year. US Yoga Alliance set the 200 hour base and many Australian yoga teacher trainers use that instead of the 350 hours.

16:55 Basic training – basic techniques and tools of yoga. All of them have direct/indirect effects on physical body, body systems. Energy, emotion, and how the mind works. Basic teacher training focuses on the asana tool most and little if any done with other tools. All teacher trainings need a foundation of psychology as well as anatomy.

19:40 Basic trained teachers must welcome/teach people in a general yoga class who have mental health issues in a way that is safe, accepting and can modify for their needs. Basically trained teachers don’t’ have these skills. Some tools/techniques can make some mental health issues worse. For a general yoga class, if it is not suitable, people with mental health issues may not come or may not come back.  Need specific training if want to work with specific mental health issues.

22:00 If offering general yoga classes, what is the basic knowledge needed to address mental health issues. Most importantly, that people feel safe. And then to have a relationship with students, get to know them, need to decide what is safe by talking within the relationship. YTT lacks training in communication skills. Yoga doesn’t help everyone. Breath as an example can be problematic for some. Yoga teaching must be more personal.

27:45 Next step is to reframe teacher training. Need more and better education/training. More solid foundations; much more depth. Has to be more than safe, also effective. The west has taken a small part of yoga and maximized and popularized it.

31:20 Business of yoga – more training, more expensive. Is the investment worth it to the individual yoga teacher given current payment systems.? To change it: yoga teachers make it change through yoga organisations. Are willing to embrace that and will the market accept it? May be push back. Otherwise, it may be legislated. If you want to work with vulnerable people, will have to be licensed. Has happened in other areas of alternative health therapies. When talking about these changes, lots of talk about the business concerns but should be talking about the care of people.  A lot of money involved and people’s livelihood.

36:30 Yoga and mental health is a growing area of interest and need more evidence more robust research. What are the benefits of different lineages, tools, methods for people with mental health issues.

Contact:

Email: michael@yogainstitute.com.au

Website: www.yogainstitute.com.au

FB: yogainstituesydney

Insta: theyogainstitute

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/TeacherTrainingYoga

Mar 12, 2019

SN Jivana

Introduction

2:02 Awareness of benefits of yoga for everyone has led accessible yoga to become more mainstream. Work to make yoga more accessible has been going on for some time – extending yoga to different populations.

4:50 Yoga media is not reflecting reality. Yoga Journal did not fully commit to putting Jessamyn Stanley (a black, large-bodied yogi) on the cover as they had said they would. But when the most conservative yoga media moves in that direction, there is progress.

6:34 Progress but push back from corporate yoga. Specialized classes are not as profitable. Large yoga chains offer “gym” yoga. There are two different yogas “gym yoga” and everybody yoga. Accessible yoga is getting back to what yoga is. Yoga is 1000’s of years old and started for monastic males but has changed many times. Yoga is the west is more physical but it is changing as the spiritual aspects of yoga become more important. Also, the potential injuries of extreme physical yoga are becoming known as more high profile yogis are having hip replacements.

10:52 In the future, dichotomy will remain. Physical yoga needs a new name and will be subsumed into the gym culture .Accessible yoga teachers need to have skills to have a diverse, integrated, mixed level classes to address anyone who comes into the room. Many just want to participate in a yoga class.

12:20 Teaching skills to teaching levels of pose at same time. Most teach one level and then other level. Find language to teach both. Preparation can be different and then the cues for the pose are the same. Example: cobra pose explanation for mat and chair students.

16:13 Awareness growing of simple, subtle yoga. Body mechanics for safety. Yoga why do we do this practice; why do we do this pose – what are benefits and how do we make this benefit available for everyone.

17:50 Western yoga is maturing. Questions about what is yoga, how do we make it beneficial for everyone.

19:10 Extreme physical yoga practice will become subsumed in gym environment. Other yoga focusses on spiritual, mental health, emotional health is growing up and maturing. So much more diverse inclusive classes available

20:57 Large yoga brands will see this “accessible yoga” as marketing opportunity. May take away accessible yoga’s opportunity to own the message, not letting the brands to formulate the message. Clothing brands sell on aspirational model. Will start campaigns based on accessible yoga. Don’t let them co-opt the message. How do we maintain control of the message. It can feel like success to be included but what is lost. How well do these corporations support the community.

25:44 Accessible yoga is not as profitable; can’t be scaled up as easily. It may be a financial burden for students to pay for classes. Accessible yoga teachers can not make a living from teaching yoga classes. They are often asked to teach for free. Value in well trained teacher who should be paid and make a living. We need additional financial models. Yoga industry multi-million dollar industry. 99% of yoga teachers can’t make a living. That’s not acceptable. Teaching training and private classes are more profitable. Accessible classes need to be profitable to continue. Corporates need to support yoga teachers. Yoga Alliance is considering paying teachers directly to teach accessible courses. Recently added to their mission M making yoga accessible.

30:00  Making progress – lululemon  could be the model. Yoga Service Council – supports accessible yoga organisations.

31:04 Accessible Yoga book by Jivana will be out in the fall. It is for students who think they can’t do yoga to shift awareness.

Contacts:

Email: jivana@accessibleyoga.org

FB and Insta: accessibleyo gaproject

                        accessibleyogatraining

                        accessibleyogaambassadors

Website: www.accessibleyoga.org

www.accessibleyogatrainings.org (30 trainings worldwide this year)

Conference: Accessible Yoga in St. Louis end of May and in New York in the fall

Mar 5, 2019

 Yoga and Trauma: Now and In the Future

Introduction:

3:49 Yoga and trauma came together as more was known about trauma. Bessel van der Kolk who did a small study of yoga and PTSD. He is a strong voice, and the trauma community recognized the body’s role in trauma healing. Allows a safe and structured way for body to feel again. PTSD as a diagnosis occurred in the 1980’s Society has realized that everyone has experienced trauma in their lifetime. Can react to trauma in present moment situations that not helpful to situation.

6:38 Research has focussed and supported yoga as a helpful modality for trauma. Research studies for PTSD have had encouraging results – lots of feasibility studies. Demand for yoga for trauma courses are very strong. Heather’s popular yoga for trauma course attracts psychiatrists, psychologists, psychotherapists, and yoga teachers. More and more course applications are from the medical community.

9:12 Yoga teachers should know about trauma. Recently published a book  (Yoga for Mental Health by Kelly Birch and Heather Mason) where chapters are written by experts in their field. A chapter about  trauma focused yoga therapy by Daniel Libby and Dana Moore is provides a good information on this topic. Yoga teachers dealing with students who are experiencing PTSD should be careful of language during class. The student’s experience may not be positive either mentally, physically or emotionally. Don’t tell people what they are likely to feel. PTSD is likely to make people feel disembodied. Better to give them a cue with a focal point (e.g., you may feel tension in your hamstrings at the back of the legs in a forward bend). Touch should be approved by the student at all times. Movement to make yoga trauma-sensitive but yoga can be so much more than that because of its effect on the autonomic nervous system.

13:05 Yoga Training for Trauma: when dealing with PTSD understanding what people are presenting with (it can be variable) – more difficult if have a group class. Restorative allows people to deeply rest but some may some may feel vulnerable. Moving can be empowering. Every style of yoga can be appropriate for people with PTSD; depends on the stage they are in, what’s going on and their proclivities. All teachers need to understand how to handle triggering. Can’t stop anyone from triggering. All yoga teacher training courses should have a mental health component because yoga classes have a higher percentage of people attending with mental health issues than the population average. Teach yoga teaches to handle general mental health issues and triggering.

20:00 Overall yoga community is more aware of trauma but see growing interest from mental health professionals in the therapeutic value of yoga. #Metoo movement and the reporting about yoga teachers abusing their students has created awareness of inappropriate touch. Adjustments are Ok with informed consent (and to be informed, have to be in tune with their body to know if they allow touch)

22:50 Where will trauma and yoga be in 10 years? Yoga will be more and more integrated into the mental health system (in UK). Difference between health care systems in different countries makes it difficult to predict and will manifest differently. In UK – trauma-based treatments with yoga components are now included in their national health care system (NHS).  Yoga teachers will be increasingly aware of value of yoga for mental health issues and best practices. More research in this area. Flourishing of classes for those with mental health issues. Yoga community should offer yoga saying it is for depression anxiety, PTSD, trauma.  People are desperate for help. The stigma of mental health illness is decreasing now and will continue to do so. Online technologies allow people to access yoga in their homes.

27:00 Integrated into the system in UK; how can we get into the health care systems in all countries. Where health care is paid for by the government, it is easy as only have to convince one entity while a system of 100’s of insurance companies is much harder to enter. Governments want low-cost, effective and efficient modalities for their health care systems. UK and India are making great progress, most successful countries will export their systems to others. Countries like the US where individuals pay for their health care will be interesting. But Medicare does pay for the Dean Ornish treatment which includes yoga. Either UK, India or Sweden may be the model for the rest of the world.

29:30 Parliamentary Group – Yoga in Society. Heather is the Secretary of the Group and it has four pillars. Yoga in: a) education, b) criminal justice system, c) health care, and d) occupational health. Different groups are working in all four areas.

31:33 Yoga and Trauma for yoga teachers who are suffering from mental health issues remember you do not have to be the perfect guru. That will delay your own healing process and creates false expectations

Contact:

www.themindedinstitute.com

Twitter: yogamind

FB: yoga therapy for the mind

Email: heather.f.mason@gmail.com

 

 

 

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